Tinder Is Phasing Out Higher Prices for Users Ages 29-Plus

Age appeared to be a significant factor driving the prices that different users saw for Tinder Plus, the lowest subscription tier, according to a new international case study released today. The study says Tinder prices also seemed to vary with other factors, including sexual orientation, gender, and location, but the data was not statistically significant.

However, users may “still see some small variations in pricing” depending on the platform they’re using to access Tinder, or when the company does price testing, according to a spokesperson for Match Group, which owns Tinder and several other dating apps. The company didn’t provide details about why Tinder is ending age-based pricing.

The new study recruited 96 Tinder users per country in Brazil, India, the Netherlands, and New Zealand, in addition to the U.S., between May and September 2021. The study also recruited 48 users in South Korea; researchers say they recruited only heterosexual-identifying users in that country to avoid potential risks to participants.

Different participants saw widely varied prices, both within countries and across borders. Such pricing “is likely achieved through an algorithm, using a combination of data points to determine what price to offer to each individual consumer,” according to the study, which was conducted by Consumers International (a consortium of organizations that includes Consumer Reports) and the Mozilla Foundation.

“It’s unfair because consumers don’t know that it’s happening,” says Jeffrey Moriarty, the executive director of the Hoffman Center for Business Ethics at Bentley University in Waltham, Mass. “They’re playing the game by rules that you don’t know about and have not agreed to because they’re doing it without your knowledge.”

Certain variations in pricing, such as student and senior discounts, are legal, but some other forms of price discrimination are against the law. “Typically it’s been found to be illegal when price discrimination is based on things like race, gender, age, religion, marital status, national origin, or disability,” says Robert Weiss, a partner at the law firm Barnes & Thornburg in Chicago who specializes in information technology law.

Tinder Gold Review: Is It Worth it?

Why do I have to pay to see who likes me on Tinder?

Tinder is a business and needs to make money to keep the lights on and pay for things like customer service, servers, etc. Paying to see who likes you is one of the premium add-ons Tinder offers to help the company make money.

No, Tinder does not accept cryptocurrency. The only ways to pay for a membership are through iTunes, Google Play, or credit card. If those platforms allow you to link crypto to your account, then you can technically pay that way, but it is not currently available directly through the platform.

Tinder Is Phasing Out Higher Prices for Users Ages 29-Plus

Different participants saw widely varied prices, both within countries and across borders. Such pricing “is likely achieved through an algorithm, using a combination of data points to determine what price to offer to each individual consumer,” according to the study, which was conducted by Consumers International (a consortium of organizations that includes Consumer Reports) and the Mozilla Foundation.

The new study recruited 96 Tinder users per country in Brazil, India, the Netherlands, and New Zealand, in addition to the U.S., between May and September 2021. The study also recruited 48 users in South Korea; researchers say they recruited only heterosexual-identifying users in that country to avoid potential risks to participants.

“It’s unfair because consumers don’t know that it’s happening,” says Jeffrey Moriarty, the executive director of the Hoffman Center for Business Ethics at Bentley University in Waltham, Mass. “They’re playing the game by rules that you don’t know about and have not agreed to because they’re doing it without your knowledge.”

The Consumers International study found no statistically significant evidence that gender or sexual preference were related to pricing. However, in the U.S., men who participated in the study saw an average price 6.5 percent higher than women. Americans outside of major cities were quoted 11.5 percent more than people in major metropolitan areas.

I want to live in a world where consumers take advantage of technology, not the other way around. Access to reliable information is the way to make that happen, and thats why I spend my time chasing it down. When Im off the clock, you can find me working my way through an ever-growing list of podcasts. Got a tip? Drop me an email ( [email protected]) or follow me on Twitter ( @ThomasGermain) for my contact info on Signal.

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